CURRENT EXHIBITION

NOW SHOWING

NOT GOOD PLACE & BLOODLINES
EXHIBITION OPENING - THURSDAY MAY 3, 5.31pm - 8.30pm CONTINUES MAY 4 - 20 MAY

OPENING NIGHT OF NEXT WAVE FESTIVAL 2018
Welcome and Smoking Ceremony

Special Guest Performance by: Djirri Djirri Dancers
DJ: Paul Goorie

NOT GOOD PLACE by Adam Ridgeway & Josh Muir

Will veracity or idealism reign supreme when we take responsibility for the effects of both on our country and our wellbeing?

Once again, the wisdom of First Peoples cuts through illusion to remind us of the bigger picture and warn us of the error of our ways. Revealing the harsh but necessary truth about where the path of human civilisation is heading, ancestors, elders and country possess the tools to guide us through the civilised psychosis that is modern living.

Across two sites (sunset and sunrise), sculpture, projection and sound are used to analyse the often destructive nature of city life, underlining the inherent responsibilities we each have to halt the damage that threatens both our country and our wellbeing. Told through a series of traditional totemic shields (reimagined in large-scale sculptural form), this is a wake-up call from the misguided pull of the rat race.

Animation -Cassidy Wanganeen
Sound Designer -James Henry

Image: Josh Muir

Projection Nights Thursday – Saturday at Sunset til 8:30pm

Not Good Place has been assisted by City of Melbourne, Creative Victoria and Blak Dot Gallery.

nextwave.org.au/events/not-good-place/

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BLOODLINES — an insightful and poignant exhibition showcasing the untold story of an intergenerational struggle.

 by Sancintya Mohini Simpson

Along with culture and tradition, memories and trauma are also passed down to the next generation, shaping who we are. A story told through a narrative of Indian miniature paintings with sound, video and prose, Bloodlines addresses the unacknowledged history and experiences of women taken from South India to South Africa as indentured labour during the late 1800’s and throughout the early 1900’s.

Tricked onto vessels, and often raped and abused on board before being mistreated on the sugar cane plantations they were sent to, these women buried their stories beneath years of shame, intergenerational trauma, and loss of culture. Simpson journeys with her mother to search for historical information through disappearing oral histories, from their own matrilineal heritage. By sharing these harrowing experiences, Simpson affords them a rightful place in history.

Image
Sancintya Mohini Simpson, In Fields of Cane (video still), 2018

Bloodlines has been assisted by the Australian Government through Australia Council, its arts and funding body, Arts Queensland and Blak Dot Gallery.

http://nextwave.org.au/events/bloodlines/

#notgoodplace #bloodlines #nextwave #blakdotgallery


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